BitTorrent’s Bleep Messenger Restores Privacy: Requires No Servers

BitTorrent’s Bleep Messenger Restores Privacy: Requires No Servers

Good news for BitTorrent followers. The torrent client has released Bleep – a p2p (peer-to-peer app) created for private messaging. No leaked images and personal files, no hackers’ attacks. This is what Bleep promises to give to its users.

Bleep has been developed with privacy in mind. Messages are encrypted with an end-to-end method. In combination with the p2p architecture, the messages will be only stored locally on the user’s device.

Unlike other messengers like AIM or Skype, Bleep is classified as a decentralized communication platform, developed to shield both metadata and anonymity. In other words, no servers are required for the Bleep service meaning that the sent messages will not be transferred to a central company server.

Bleep is built around the same type of peer-to-peer technology applied for decentralized file sharing. Despite being the ‘mother company’, BitTorrent will not track down communications between users. This means that shared information will stay protected, along with its duration and exact time and date.

The Bleep messenger will also be able to get messages to offline friends when they are online again. The BitTorrent development team has been exploring the idea since last year. Another feature that the server-less messenger provides is called Whisper. Whisper will delete any message 25 seconds after it has been viewed by the receiver. Furthermore, it will also eliminate the risk of screenshots leakage via blocking the sender’s nickname.

Even when users decide to tap an eye icon to show the nickname, both the conversation and the image will be blurred. If by any chance any data is leaked, it will not be associated with a particular sender.

The name of the application – Bleep – is inspired by the phrase ‘bleep out’ popular in broadcasting services. The noise ‘bleep’ is applied when an offensive word is said on air. In the sense of the application’s name, the developers may have added a pinch of sense of humor. Everything users bleep out will not be exposed to third party intruders often responsible for the theft of personally identifiable information.

What is the conclusion? BitTorrent is progressing and leaving behind any accusations made by rights holders. As a matter of fact, Bleep may be considered just the beginning. The torrent client is simultaneously working on Maelstrom – a p2p browser that will not require a central web server.